William Dougall Photography William Dougall Photography

Humans of UBC

  • Hera Sfikas

    Hera Sfikas

    "When I was 12, my parents got a divorce. My Mom moved me and my sisters back to B.C. and my Dad went to Seattle so we could still visit him from time to time. My parents divorce was what triggered my depression. It's something that I have been battling for six years now.
    When I was fourteen, I got into a two year long relationship with a boy who turned out to be abusive, manipulative, and controlling. This really only caused everything to become worse.
    I developed an eating disorder, my self esteem was at an all time low, and it really felt like I didn't have a way out of anything.
    But I found my way out. I started playing rugby when I was thirteen, although I never thought I was too good at it. Through practice and hard work, I was able to refine my skills and become the captain of my high school's team. I have represented the province several times as well. Through this sport, I have met the most amazing people, and I keep them really close to me. Seeing a past teammate, and current ones is like seeing my family.
    Now I'm here at my dream school playing on the varsity squad. Rugby gave me a home, and an outlet when I needed it the most. This sport taught me that I could be the smallest person on the field and still make the biggest impact.
    I never really realized how important of a factor I was to other people because I had always felt so insignificant. And I still do sometimes, but with this sport I can tackle my feelings head on knowing that I have the support of such an amazing community.
    I was able to battle my depression with the help of this sport and came out with only scars. Now, I'm so proud and confident to be myself.
    So please, don't ever stop looking for what keeps you going. And once you find it, keep it close to you. It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog. You may feel small, and maybe even insignificant at times, and that's okay. What matters is how you pull yourself up from the ground. You're strong enough to accomplish anything.
    Never give up."
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Rees Pillizzi

    Rees Pillizzi

    "Change is a funny thing. We spend so much time denying or resenting it at first. Then, we fall in love with it. Growing up I hated change in all its forms. It is for this reason first term was such a shock. Things changed in my life that I hadn't even realised were able to change. I spent too much time clinging to the past, holding on to whatever was left of my past life. Then in the airport waiting for my flight home I realised something. Change is a beautiful thing. For me to even admit that I myself had to change. I had to let go of the part of me that hid from it. Change is the foundation for progress. I realised all of the changes that have taken place thus far are positive. I love my new city, my new friends, my university, and ultimately my new life. The key to accepting new things is letting go of the past. The past is the past. The future is the future. Right now is a gift, thats why its called the present."
  • Stefan Lehto-Borich

    Stefan Lehto-Borich

    "To be completely honest, I don’t know why I’m doing this. Every time I even begin to think of it brings up a world of emotions. But isn’t that what we need sometimes, to express ourselves? Well, the English language does not have a word that truly describes the pain and suffering of losing one’s mother. To this day I am still haunted from the images engraved in my mind of her final days; a bleak and weak woman, who used to be so full of life and colour. Seeing her lay motionless on her deathbed is a sight no 12 year old child should witness. With that being said, in a way her death gave me life. It freed me from the small northern bushtown of Thunder Bay Ontario, and led me to beautiful Vancouver. It allowed me to explore and discover the world beyond rock and trees. It gave me the chance to meet new people and make lifelong friends. It gave me a new beginning to strive for greatness, and that I have done. I am more determined than ever to succeed in life, not only for me, but for her as well. Since she passed, I have learned three valuable lessons that I would like to pass on to you: Appreciate everything that is given to you, big or small, pricy or not. Never miss an opportunity to tell someone how much they mean to you; one never knows when they might see them again. Give everything you have to whatever you are doing at the time; no matter the result, you will have gained something from that experience and that is the true goal.
    Take from this what you will, but these three lessons have made me to be the man I am today, my mom would be proud."
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography
  • Humans of UBC - William Dougall Photography